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  #1  
Old Apr 25th, 2013, 04:38 PM
Richard Hamilton Richard Hamilton is offline
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Talking We love the "unofficial" network repeatability

While I came in here to reply to another thread, I thought I would mention something else.

We currently use one of our Sonos ZPs as an "internet connection." Yea yea, this is not supported, so I am just saying that I hope Sonos does not do anything to remove this capability in the future.

Here is what I mean...
We have a large house and at one end we have a Wifi blind spot. Last year we wanted to connect our Yamaha piano and our pool equipment to the internet, so we could control both of them with our iPhone or iPad (via our local network or internet).

The problem was that even if we put in a WiFi repeater, it was still too far to communicate to any one of our 3 WiFi routers scattered around the house. And of course there was no wired network in that area either. No, a range extender, booster antennas or none of that crap would solve the problem.

Solution, utilize the beautiful ability of the Sonos mesh network because the Sonos ZP in that room flawlessly communicated with other nearby ZPs.

We plugged a cheap WiFi Access Point into the ZP Ethernet port and sat the Access Point a few feet away to not interfere with the RF signal. For a year now, the pool equipment and piano wireless talk to the Access Point and use the SONOS mesh network to get back to the bridge that is connected to our main router. Then out to the internet. To us, this is a nice feature because it doesn't force us to take an expensive alternative solution and works just fine for low bandwidth communications.

Thanks Sonos.... even if you don't support this feature
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  #2  
Old Apr 25th, 2013, 09:56 PM
NoBoB NoBoB is offline
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Originally Posted by Richard Hamilton View Post
We currently use one of our Sonos ZPs as an "internet connection." Yea yea, this is not supported, so I am just saying that I hope Sonos does not do anything to remove this capability in the future.
I'm not sure where you got the impression that using a Sonos unit as a wireless Ethernet Bridge was unsupported. That's one of the features of the built-in Ethernet ports, they extend your network over Sonosnet.

The common admonition is to avoid housing the local music library on a device that requires a WiFi hop to get to Sonosnet. Even then, many folks get away with it anyway
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  #3  
Old Apr 26th, 2013, 01:45 AM
ratty ratty is offline
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Originally Posted by Richard Hamilton View Post
I am just saying that I hope Sonos does not do anything to remove this capability in the future.
It's a bit difficult to see how they ever could. The Bridge (or any other Sonos unit for that matter) 'bridges' between wired and SonosNet segments. Traffic flows both ways.

The only caution is that using SonosNet to haul large amounts of non-Sonos traffic around could compromise Sonos audio performance.
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Old Apr 26th, 2013, 08:32 AM
Richard Hamilton Richard Hamilton is offline
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Originally Posted by NoBoB View Post
I'm not sure where you got the impression that using a Sonos unit as a wireless Ethernet Bridge was unsupported. That's one of the features of the built-in Ethernet ports, they extend your network over Sonosnet.

The common admonition is to avoid housing the local music library on a device that requires a WiFi hop to get to Sonosnet. Even then, many folks get away with it anyway
Hi NoBob,
Well it has been almost a couple of years, but at that time, it was actually Sonos support who told me the feature was not supported to use the Ethernet port as a "private network" connection, and that it is intended to connect various Sonos components. Perhaps I misunderstood or maybe the situation has changed, yet I was not able to get help on how to use the port for the purpose I intended. However, it was easy enough to figure out that by connecting the Zone bridge to my router in the garage, everything worked as I hoped.
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Old Apr 26th, 2013, 08:38 AM
Richard Hamilton Richard Hamilton is offline
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Originally Posted by ratty View Post
It's a bit difficult to see how they ever could. The Bridge (or any other Sonos unit for that matter) 'bridges' between wired and SonosNet segments. Traffic flows both ways.

The only caution is that using SonosNet to haul large amounts of non-Sonos traffic around could compromise Sonos audio performance.
Thanks for the comment. I agree.
And yes, I am only using it for very low bandwidth.

Also, just to be clear from NoBob's comment, I am not placing my music library on a WiFi device. It is on a hard-wired network connected server. I'm just using the Sonos mesh network to move traffic from the piano room WiFi Access Point that mainly talks to WiFi pool equipment, a WiFi piano, and WiFi outdoor weather station.
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  #6  
Old Apr 26th, 2013, 09:14 AM
ratty ratty is offline
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I'm just using the Sonos mesh network to move traffic from the piano room WiFi Access Point that mainly talks to WiFi pool equipment, a WiFi piano, and WiFi outdoor weather station.
Intermittent traffic to a WiFi AP should be fine. It's not uncommon to use the SonosNet mesh to provide 'backhaul' for remote APs, for example to extend WiFi coverage for iDevice Sonos controllers.
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  #7  
Old Jun 10th, 2013, 11:48 AM
DrHitch DrHitch is offline
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Default Using SONOSnet as "bootleg" IP backhaul net

Hey Ratty (and others),

So, It looks like the SONOS devices can be also used to "repeat" standard IP traffic from my router through the SONOS "airwaves" and then out of a SONOS device to my remote PC, etc....

Question: If my remote PC is "out of range" from my regular 802.11n router, and the SONOS bridge is located right next to the router, then what makes the proprietary SONOS signal over 802.11 stronger such that I would consider using the SONOSnet as a bridging mechanism?
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  #8  
Old Jun 10th, 2013, 11:55 AM
jgatie jgatie is online now
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Originally Posted by DrHitch View Post
Hey Ratty (and others),

So, It looks like the SONOS devices can be also used to "repeat" standard IP traffic from my router through the SONOS "airwaves" and then out of a SONOS device to my remote PC, etc....

Question: If my remote PC is "out of range" from my regular 802.11n router, and the SONOS bridge is located right next to the router, then what makes the proprietary SONOS signal over 802.11 stronger such that I would consider using the SONOSnet as a bridging mechanism?
If you only have the Bridge and one other Sonos component, then there is no difference. But because Sonosnet is a mesh, you do not need to be in range of the Bridge if you have other Sonos components in range. See this link for more details on the Sonosnet mesh:

https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answe...26/kw/Sonosnet
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  #9  
Old Jun 10th, 2013, 11:55 AM
ratty ratty is offline
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Originally Posted by DrHitch View Post
So, It looks like the SONOS devices can be also used to "repeat" standard IP traffic from my router through the SONOS "airwaves" and then out of a SONOS device to my remote PC, etc....
Think of it as "repeat" if you prefer, but "bridge" is the appropriate term.

Quote:
Question: If my remote PC is "out of range" from my regular 802.11n router, and the SONOS bridge is located right next to the router, then what makes the proprietary SONOS signal over 802.11 stronger such that I would consider using the SONOSnet as a bridging mechanism?
Because it's a mesh network it can reach into corners where a regular 'hub and spoke' network would run out of steam. See https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/126
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