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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 08:14 AM
Morantex Morantex is offline
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Default What exactly does a Bridge do?

I'm a bit unclear on EXACTLY what a Bridge offers.

What can a system with a Bridge do that one without a Bridge cannot do?

Thanks
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 08:21 AM
jgatie jgatie is offline
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A Brdige has 2 purposes:

1) At least one Sonos component must be hardwired to Ethernet (usually at your router). If you have no Ethernet connection where you want to place your music players, the Bridge (named because it "bridges" between your Ethernet and Sonosnet) is an inexpensive way to achieve the wired component.

2) If you have gaps in your Sonosnet coverage, the Bridge can be used to extend this wireless coverage. Plugging in a Bridge between two distant Sonos players will allow them to connect wirelessly, whereas before they were out of range.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 08:23 AM
the_lhc the_lhc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morantex View Post
I'm a bit unclear on EXACTLY what a Bridge offers.

What can a system with a Bridge do that one without a Bridge cannot do?
Very simply the Bridge allows all Sonos playing devices (of which the Bridge is NOT one) to be used wirelessly. Without a Bridge one of your players MUST be wired to your network, which may not be particularly convenient. If that's not an issue to you and you can wire one or more of your players then you have no need for the Bridge.

You can also use the Bridge to extend the wireless range of Sonos by placing it between two players that are struggling to communicate with each other due to distance or thick walls.
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Old Apr 25th, 2013, 08:31 AM
ratty ratty is offline
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A third use for a Bridge is to connect any non-Sonos device to the local network without using WiFi. In this mode the Bridge functions as a wireless Ethernet bridge (as can any Sonos unit) and provide a wired connection for devices which need one.
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Old Apr 26th, 2013, 06:47 AM
id@53 id@53 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ratty View Post
A third use for a Bridge is to connect any non-Sonos device to the local network without using WiFi. In this mode the Bridge functions as a wireless Ethernet bridge (as can any Sonos unit) and provide a wired connection for devices which need one.
Hi ratty,
Just wondering if you have any idea what sort of performance could I realistically expect if I used a Bridge in this fashion? Would it provide sufficient bandwidth to enable me to connect my Sky box to the network for Sky's OnDemand service?
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Old Apr 26th, 2013, 07:50 AM
Morantex Morantex is offline
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Thanks for these answers - much appreciated.

The sad thing is that when I purchased my SONOS units last year from BestBuy the guy I spoke to about them did NOT mention the need for a Bridge for pure wireless operation.

He just vaguely talked about "range" and so on.

I bought one anyway cos I'm a techy and knew it would serve a use but the sales guys need some better education here.

Speaking of issues related to range:

1. I thought SONOS was mesh so each unit behaved a bit like a transponder and was able to receive WiFi yet retransmit data itself - thus serving as a range extender when inserted "between" two other players?

2. To use a bridge purely for range extension - must it still be wired to the network or in this "mode" does it behave as a simple WiFi extender?

THanks
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Old Apr 26th, 2013, 08:24 AM
escream escream is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morantex View Post
1. I thought SONOS was mesh so each unit behaved a bit like a transponder and was able to receive WiFi yet retransmit data itself - thus serving as a range extender when inserted "between" two other players?

2. To use a bridge purely for range extension - must it still be wired to the network or in this "mode" does it behave as a simple WiFi extender?

THanks
To these 2 questions:
1. Sonos does indeed provide its own mesh network. So each individual Sonos device can act as a range "extender". Nevertheless, consider the scenario where you have 2 Sonos units that are too far apart to be able to communicate via their wifi signal. Using a bridge in-between those two to extend your Sonos mesh is cheaper (50 bucks) than installing even the cheapest of the other Sonos units (300 bucks) if you don't really need an additional one at that particular location.

2. The pre-requisite is simple: at least 1 Sonos unit must be hard-wired. If you have more, that's just fine. If you have none, you're in trouble. Wether the one wired unit is your Bridge or your Play:5 doesn't matter.

Hope I'm not mistaken and I hope it helps :-p
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  #8  
Old Apr 26th, 2013, 08:48 AM
NoBoB NoBoB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morantex View Post
1. I thought SONOS was mesh so each unit behaved a bit like a transponder and was able to receive WiFi yet retransmit data itself - thus serving as a range extender when inserted "between" two other players?
Let's not use the term WiFi there. WiFi is the common abbreviation for 802.11 wireless networking. Sonos operates in that radio band, but it is not WiFi. A pure Sonos system (with Sonos-branded Controllers) will operate without WiFi present at all. Sonosnet is separate from, and in addition to, WiFi.

Other than the terminology, your point about the mesh is correct. A Sonos device receives and transmits Sonosnet.

Quote:
2. To use a bridge purely for range extension - must it still be wired to the network or in this "mode" does it behave as a simple WiFi extender?
One Sonos device must be wired to your network. After that, you can wire as many as you like, but only one is mandatory. Regardless of its connection method, a Bridge still participates in the Sonosnet mesh (again, though, not WiFi) and its Ethernet ports are an extension of your network.
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  #9  
Old Apr 26th, 2013, 08:52 AM
ratty ratty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by id@53 View Post
Hi ratty,
Just wondering if you have any idea what sort of performance could I realistically expect if I used a Bridge in this fashion? Would it provide sufficient bandwidth to enable me to connect my Sky box to the network for Sky's OnDemand service?
I'm not sure if there's been official confirmation of SonosNet bandwidth. It's based on the 802.11g/n physical layer but carries an additional protocol overhead.

Given that your Sky IPTV bandwidth needs are unlikely to be more than 3-4Mbps SonosNet should cope without problem so long as it has a decent wireless signal.
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  #10  
Old Apr 26th, 2013, 09:16 AM
id@53 id@53 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ratty View Post
Given that your Sky IPTV bandwidth needs are unlikely to be more than 3-4Mbps SonosNet should cope without problem so long as it has a decent wireless signal.
Cheers ratty
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