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  #1  
Old Nov 27th, 2008, 12:31 PM
jp69 jp69 is offline
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Default ZP100 vs ZP120

Hi,
I'm discovering Sonos system, what are the differences between ZP100 and ZP120, also ZP80 and 90.
I saw on ZP120 there are no auxiliary outputs
Is there something else, quality or other.
thank you
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  #2  
Old Nov 27th, 2008, 01:21 PM
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RO53BEN RO53BEN is offline
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Originally Posted by jp69 View Post
Hi,
I'm discovering Sonos system, what are the differences between ZP100 and ZP120, also ZP80 and 90.
I saw on ZP120 there are no auxiliary outputs
Is there something else, quality or other.
thank you
ZP100/ZP80 are the old models, no longer being manufactured but there is still existing stock with a full warranty available at many resellers.

The ZP90 has replaced the ZP80. It's identical, except it now supports Sonosnet 2.0, which double wireless range and improves connection reliabilty but using a newer 802.11n style wifi adapter.

The ZP120 replaces the ZP100. It has a switching amplifier which offers 55W per channel RMS instead of 50W for the ZP100. It also supports SonosNet 2.0 and, as you noticed, doesn't have phono audio outputs. It also only has 2 ethernet sockets instead of 4 on the ZP100. The ZP120 is smaller.
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  #3  
Old Nov 27th, 2008, 06:26 PM
blakekrone blakekrone is offline
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Originally Posted by RO53BEN View Post

... which double wireless range and improves connection reliabilty but using a newer 802.11n style wifi adapter.
While I wish this was true, it has been a great addition using the improved wireless range having a couple of ZP120's and a ZP90 around the house.

If you have a smaller house and can pick up a ZP100/80 for cheaper, I would probably go that route.

802.11n doesn't double the range, it just makes it so that the data rates at the edge of the wireless range are higher by coping with multi-path issues.
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  #4  
Old Nov 28th, 2008, 06:43 AM
exdirtfarmer exdirtfarmer is offline
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Originally Posted by blakekrone View Post
802.11n doesn't double the range, it just makes it so that the data rates at the edge of the wireless range are higher by coping with multi-path issues.
Good point. 802.11n tech may offer "Extended" range and "improved" performance. The extent of which may not be as apparant as advertised.

zp120 and zp90 offer improved wireless over the older models.
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  #5  
Old Nov 28th, 2008, 08:59 AM
buzz buzz is offline
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Notes:

Better wireless performance is realized only when the new units are use at both ends of the wireless link. There is no advantage if a ZP100, ZP80, or ZoneBridge is at one end of wireless link and a ZP120 or ZP90 at the other end.

The ZP120 provides two network ports and the ZP100 provides four ports.

The ZP100 provides Line-Out, the ZP120 does not.
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  #6  
Old Nov 28th, 2008, 10:03 AM
ghard1 ghard1 is offline
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Dropping the line out option on the 120 to me (as well as many other installers I have spoken with) a huge mistake. The versatility of the bundles have dropped significantly. Removing ethernet ports is understandable (and an easy fix if necessary).

I would estimate that 70% of the Sonos systems I have installed were to supplement an existing distributed audio setup where Sonos was used as a source only component (using line out). In northern climates, purchasing the bundle (BU130) including a ZP100 was very beneficial. I often used the ZP100 as a second source component in addition to the ZP80 with the ZP100 using line out only - in a distributed audio system for the cold months (when we hibernate and listen to music here up north). I would then remove the ZP100 from the DA system (leaving the ZP80) and use it as a somewhat portable device in the summer months (by connecting a pair of speakers) in areas where permanent speaker installation was not possible or did not warrant the extra cost (around the pool, garage, garden etc.). By removing the line out on the 120, I have lost this great selling point.

I understand that the 120 is slightly smaller than the 100 and that the line out was removed to conserve space. However, I do know of other devices which allow RCA's to be configured through software to be used as either an input or an output. This would have been a great way around the real estate issue.
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Old Nov 28th, 2008, 10:09 AM
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RO53BEN RO53BEN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blakekrone View Post
While I wish this was true, it has been a great addition using the improved wireless range having a couple of ZP120's and a ZP90 around the house.

If you have a smaller house and can pick up a ZP100/80 for cheaper, I would probably go that route.

802.11n doesn't double the range, it just makes it so that the data rates at the edge of the wireless range are higher by coping with multi-path issues.
From http://sonos.com/whattobuy/ZP120/

Quote:
Best-in-class wireless technology for multi-room music

The ZP120 brings great sounding music wirelessly to any room in your house, without a big wiring project. SonosNet 2.0, our latest wireless mesh network technology, provides double the wireless range for whole-house coverage, ensures synchronous music playback, and avoids sources of wireless interference. Which means the music gets to all the right rooms — near or far — at exactly the right time.
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  #8  
Old Nov 28th, 2008, 11:16 AM
blakekrone blakekrone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzz View Post
Notes:

Better wireless performance is realized only when the new units are use at both ends of the wireless link. There is no advantage if a ZP100, ZP80, or ZoneBridge is at one end of wireless link and a ZP120 or ZP90 at the other end.

The ZP120 provides two network ports and the ZP100 provides four ports.

The ZP100 provides Line-Out, the ZP120 does not.
I won't get into a long winded argument with buzz or RO5SBEN as their input in this community is awesome, but...

Actually not true. 802.11n performance is seen by both n and non-n devices. 802.11n gives you speed increase obviously if all devices are n-capable, but n also gives better signal quality to non-n devices if the receiving device is n. One of the features of n is mimo which is multiple input multiple output, with 802.11a/b/g if a signal is heard at a receiving end multiple times out of phase the signal is ignored, mimo allows you to use both signals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RO53BEN View Post
Marketing fluff is great, real performance this is not true. Being a wireless engineer I have all the tools required for lab tests. 802.11n does not double the range, it makes it so that the data rates at the edges are far more stable, while this may increase the range, it does not double it. I will admit I have an increase in range, this includes an increase with a mixed environment.
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  #9  
Old Nov 28th, 2008, 11:20 AM
blakekrone blakekrone is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghard1 View Post
Dropping the line out option on the 120 to me (as well as many other installers I have spoken with) a huge mistake. The versatility of the bundles have dropped significantly. Removing ethernet ports is understandable (and an easy fix if necessary).

I would estimate that 70% of the Sonos systems I have installed were to supplement an existing distributed audio setup where Sonos was used as a source only component (using line out). In northern climates, purchasing the bundle (BU130) including a ZP100 was very beneficial. I often used the ZP100 as a second source component in addition to the ZP80 with the ZP100 using line out only - in a distributed audio system for the cold months (when we hibernate and listen to music here up north). I would then remove the ZP100 from the DA system (leaving the ZP80) and use it as a somewhat portable device in the summer months (by connecting a pair of speakers) in areas where permanent speaker installation was not possible or did not warrant the extra cost (around the pool, garage, garden etc.). By removing the line out on the 120, I have lost this great selling point.

I understand that the 120 is slightly smaller than the 100 and that the line out was removed to conserve space. However, I do know of other devices which allow RCA's to be configured through software to be used as either an input or an output. This would have been a great way around the real estate issue.
I too wish the line out was still there on the ZP120 for the same reason. I have a ZP100 that I used for my outdoor speakers in the summer months and in the winter months would hook it up to my powered computer speakers.

Sonos got the better end of the deal though as I ended up buying a ZP90 for my office to use the line out.
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  #10  
Old Nov 28th, 2008, 11:25 AM
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Avee Avee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blakekrone View Post
Marketing fluff is great, real performance this is not true. Being a wireless engineer I have all the tools required for lab tests. 802.11n does not double the range, it makes it so that the data rates at the edges are far more stable, while this may increase the range, it does not double it. I will admit I have an increase in range, this includes an increase with a mixed environment.
I guess it is a definition thing. Sonos needs pretty good reception for streaming flac. At the edge of the technical range Sonos might not be able to get the bandwidth to do that. Maybe if you define range as "distance where you get sufficient data rates to stream lossless" that useful range might actually be double.
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